Saturday, July 22, 2017

Selena Gomez's Biggest Billboard Hot 100 Hits

Selena Gomez's Biggest Billboard Hot 100 Hits:

In honor of Selena Gomez's birthday (July 22), Billboard takes a look at the pop singer/actress' impressive history on the Billboard Hot 100.

The former Disney Channel star first entered the chart in January 2009 with "Tell Me Something I Don't Know," which peaked at No. 58. That first year on the Hot 100, Gomez earned four additional entries, including her duet with Demi Lovato for Disney Channel's movie Princess Protection Program, "One and the Same" (No. 82), and Disney's Friends for Change anthem "Send It On," which sparked her first trip to the top 20 (and finds her singing with Lovato, Jonas Brothers and Miley Cyrus).

Gomez first entered the Hot 100's top 10 with "Come & Get It," which peaked at No. 6 in May 2013. She's since upped her count to seven top 10s, through her latest, "It Ain't Me," with Kygo. She has earned two top five hits: "Good for You," featuring A$AP Rocky (which tops our exclusive recap of her 10 biggest Hot 100 hits below), and "Same Old Love."



Selena Gomez'Biggest Billboard Hot 100 Hits
Rank, Title, Peak Position, Peak Date

1, "Good for You," Selena Gomez feat. A$AP Rocky, No. 5, Oct. 3, 2015
2, "Same Old Love," No. 5, Jan. 30, 2016
3, "Come & Get It," No. 6, May 25, 2013
4, "It Ain't Me," Kygo x Selena Gomez, No. 10, May 13, 2017
5, "Love You Like a Love Song," Selena Gomez & The Scene, No. 22, May 3, 2012
6, "We Don't Talk Anymore," Charlie Puth feat. Selena Gomez, No. 9, Oct. 8, 2016
7, "Hands to Myself," No. 7, Feb. 13, 2016
8, "The Heart Wants What It Wants," No. 6, Dec. 13, 2014
9, "Who Says," Selena Gomez & The Scene, No. 21, July 9, 2011
10, "Naturally," Selena Gomez & The Scene, No. 29, Jan. 30, 2010
Selena Gomez's Biggest Billboard Hot 100 hits chart is based on actual performance on the weekly Billboard Hot 100, through the July 29, 2017 ranking. Songs are ranked based on an inverse point system, with weeks at No. 1 earning the greatest value and weeks at No. 100 earning the least. Due to changes in chart methodology over the years, eras are weighted to account for different chart turnover rates over various periods.